March 20: Ikue Mori CONCERT

For the next colloquium, held on March 20 (Wednesday), we are very pleased to welcome Japanese sound artist Ikue Mori, who will give a concert “Spectra Improv + Moving Image – Ikue Mori with Ken Ueno, HKNME and friends”

 

The concert will start at 8 pm in SCM Multimedia Theatre.

Admission: registration required on https://goo.gl/forms/7fUQsxc1leCc9vrv2

 

Date: March 20, 2019 (Wednesday)

Time: 8 pm

Venue: Multimedia Theatre, G/F Run Run Shaw Creative Media Centre, 18 Tat Hong Avenue, Kowloon Tong

Admission: FREE – registration required

 

featuring

Ikue Mori 森郁恵

Ken Ueno (HK/ USA), extended vocals/ curator

Ikue Mori (JP/ USA), electronics/ video

Shane Aspegren (HK/USA), drums/ electronics

Matthew Lau (HK), percussion

Angus Lee (HK), flute

Fiona Lee (HK), electronics and objects

Simon Hui (HK), double bass

 

In partnership with the Hong Kong New Music Ensemble

 

FREE Admission, Registration Required

免費節目,請先登記留座

 

Registration登記>> https://goo.gl/forms/7fUQsxc1leCc9vrv2
Programme Enquiries 節目查詢:info@hknme.org

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March 19: Ikue Mori

For the next colloquium of the semester, held on March 19 (Tuesday), we are very pleased to welcome Japanese sound artist Ikue Mori, who will give a talk on the topic Find out how this work

The talk will start at 4:30 pm in M6094 Future Cinema Studio.

Date: March 19, 2019 (Tuesday)

Time: 4:30 pm

Venue: M6094 Future Cinema Studio, Run Run Shaw Creative Media Centre, 18 Tat Hong Avenue, Kowloon Tong

Topic: Find out how this work

 Abstract:

Ikue Mori will first give an historical introduction starting from 1977 with the downtown New York music scene, NO WAVE drummer band, improvisors and electronics composers. She will propose to the students to listen to various collaborations and solo music pieces and will talk about the transformation of the performance scene with the use of instruments, from drums, drum machines and laptop. She will finally demonstrate how to perform with Max patch and control visuals, proposing a short live performance while watching the computer window of the Max patch activity.

Biography:

Ikue Mori moved from her native city of Tokyo to New York in 1977. She started playing drums and soon formed the seminal NO WAVE band DNA, with fellow noise pioneers Arto Lindsay and Tim Wright.

DNA enjoyed legendary cult status, while creating a new brand of radical rhythms and dissonant sounds; forever altering the face of rock music.

In the mid 80’s Ikue started in employ drum machines in the unlikely context of improvised music. While limited to the standard technology provided by the drum machine, she has never the less forged her own highly sensitive signature style.

During the 90’s she has subsequently collaborated with numerous improvisors throughout the US, Europe, and Asia, while continuing to produce and record her own music.

In 1998, she was invited to perform with Ensemble Modern as the soloist along with Zeena Parkins, and composer Fred Frith, also “One hundred Aspects of the Moon” commissioned by Roulette/Mary Flagler Cary Charitable Trust.

Ikue won the Distinctive Award for Prix Ars Electronics Digital Music category in 99.

In 2000 Ikue started using the laptop computer to expand on her already signature sound, thus broadening her scope of musical expression. She was commissioned by the KITCHEN ensemble, wrote and premired the piece “Aphorism”, also awarded Civitella Ranieri Foundation Fellowship.

In 2003 she was commissioned by RELACHE Ensemble to write a piece for film In the Street and premired in Philadelphia. Started working with visual played by the music since 2004. In 2005 Awarded Alphert/Ucross Residency.

Ikue received a grant from the Foundation for Contemporary Arts in 2006. In 2007 the Tate Modern commissioned Ikue to create a live sound track for screenings of Maya Deren’s silent films. In 2008 Ikue celebrated her 30th year in NY and performed at the Japan Society. Recent commissioners include the Montalvo Arts Center and SWR German radio program and Shajah Art foundation in UAE. Current working groups include MEPHISTA with Sylvie Courvoisier and Susie Ibarra, PHANTOM ORCHARD with Zeena Parkins, project with Koichi Makigami and various ensembles of John Zorn.

March 14: Ulrich Wegenast

For the next colloquium of the semester, held on March 14, 2019 (Thursday), we are very pleased to welcome German Professor and curator Ulrich Wegenast, who will give a talk on the topic Animated Spaces – Animation, Architecture, and Game Art

The talk will start at 4:00 pm in M6094 Future Cinema Studio.

Date: March 14, 2019 (Thursday)

Time: 4:00 pm

Venue: M6094 Future Cinema Studio, Run Run Shaw Creative Media Centre, 18 Tat Hong Avenue, Kowloon Tong

Topic: Animated Spaces – Animation, Architecture, and Game Art

Abstract:

The lecture deals with new concepts of spatial animation in the context of Architecture, Game Art, and Live Performance.

In the digital age the traditional profession and role of an animator has changed rapidly. Animation can’t be regarded exclusively as a filmic medium anymore. Animation has expanded in almost all creative fields. Chris Gehman and Steve Reinke stated in their book The Sharpest Point. Animation at the End of Cinema “the very definition of animation has become unstable in the era of digital media”. Animation became one of the most flexible media distributed on every platform and is used in different contexts like architecture, engineering, and scenography. Nowadays animation has left the black box of the cinema and the TV screen and is ubiquitous. As Steve Reinke added: “In the end, animation is triumphant, but at the price of an enormous levelling: it becomes everything.” The lecture deals with the new situation and possibilities of animation evoking a new profession combining film, architecture, and game art. A central aspect of this development is the way how media spaces are created with new digital technology: on the one hand side architecture becomes more and more fluid – i.e. in the realm of the so-called Blob Architecture –, on the other hand side animation is extremely important in regard to the construction of (virtual) space. At the lecture traditional examples of animation by Raimund Krumme, Zbigniew Rybczynski or Virgil Widrich are compared with new conceptions of animation, architecture, game and installation art by companies and artists like Zeitguised or Realities United. Within this development and fusion animation studios like Nexus or H5 (Ludovic Houplain) have produced new forms of animation and visual communication which go beyond traditional animation. Another tendency in the field of expanded animation which will be discussed in the lecture is the combination between the life performance of the theatre play or the opera and real time animation in the work of groups and artists like Sputnic/Theater Dortmund or Paul Barritt. The borderline between the reproduced image and live animation becomes blurred. These new concepts of spatial communication and expanded animation will be analyzed, presented and discussed.

Biography:

Ulrich Wegenast, born 1966 in Stuttgart, graduated from Stuttgart University (Master in History and History of Art), and Hanns Eisler School of Music, Berlin (postgraduate studies in Culture and Media Management). Since 2012 he is honorary professor at the Babelsberg Film University.

1987: founding member of Wand 5 and Stuttgart Filmwinter – Festival for Expanded Media – a festival for experimental film and media art. In 2001 development of the conference „media-space“. He was member of the Wand 5-board until 2006.

From 1993-2005 has was curator for the Stuttgart International Festival of Animated Film and the European Shortfilm Biennale. In 2005 he became the artistic director of the Stuttgart Festival of Animated Film.

In 2002 he developed the experimental film section for the Munich Filmfest. Curatorial work and jury work for the Goethe Institute and various other institutions and festivals around the world. From 2003 to 2004 he has worked as a consultant for the Frankfurt Schirn Kunsthalle and 2005 for the documenta jubilee exhibition. 2005-2013 member of the advisory board of the Goethe Institute (Film, TV, Radio), 2007-2013 member of the jury of the German Short Film Award.

From 2004-2011 he was teaching Film/Media Art, Media Theory and Alternative Distribution at the Karlsruhe School of Design, Stuttgart State Art Academy, and Merz Akademie in Stuttgart. From 2004 to 2014 he was head of the media department of the Baden-Wuerttemberg Free Art Academy.

He has published a 6-part DVD edition on German animated film in cooperation with Absolut Medien, Berlin, and Goethe Institut, Munich which has received the Willi Haas Award for best DVD-edition on German speaking film in 2012.

Wegenast gave more than 100 lectures and workshops on animation, experimental film, media art, arts administration and game culture around the globe including Harvard University, University of Toronto, Berlinale Festival, Tallin Black Nights Festival, the Bangkok Culture Centre and Ars Electronica in Linz.

March 07: Richard Shusterman

For the next colloquium of the semester, held on March 7, 2019 (Thursday), we are very pleased to welcome American philosopher Richard Shusterman, who will give a talk on the topic Somaesthetics: Philosophical Roots and Performative Practice

The talk will start at 4:00 pm in M6094 Future Cinema Studio.

Date: March 07, 2019 (Thursday)

Time: 4:00 pm

Venue: M6094 Future Cinema Studio, Run Run Shaw Creative Media Centre, 18 Tat Hong Avenue, Kowloon Tong

Topic: Somaesthetics: Philosophical Roots and Performative Practice

Abstract:

After introducing the field of somaesthetics and tracing its philosophical roots and different branches, Richard Shusterman will illustrate its expression in contemporary art and philosophy, focusing ultimately on his own experience of performative practice as documented in his book The Adventures of the Man in Gold (2016).

Biography:

Richard Shusterman is the Dorothy F. Schmidt Eminent Scholar in the Humanities. Educated at Jerusalem and Oxford, he was chair of the Temple University Philosophy Department before coming to FAU in 2005. He has held academic appointments in Paris, Berlin, and Hiroshima and was awarded senior research Fulbright and NEH fellowships. His widely translated research covers many topics in the human and social sciences with particular emphasis on questions of philosophy, aesthetics, culture, language, identity, and embodiment.   Authored books include T.S. Eliot and the Philosophy of Criticism (Columbia), Practicing Philosophy (Routledge), Performing Live (Cornell), Surface and Depth (Cornell), Pragmatist Aesthetics (Blackwell, 2nd ed. Rowman & Littlefield, and translated into 12 languages), and most recently Body Consciousness (Cambridge). His non-technical essays have been published in the Nation and the Chronicle of Higher Education and in various art reviews and catalogues, such as artpress and Dokumenta. He directs the FAU Center for Body, Mind, and Culture (www.fau.edu/artsandleetters/bodymindculture).

His FAU webpage is http://www.fau.edu/artsandleetters/humanitieschair/.

March 05: Erin Johnson

For the next colloquium of the semester, held on March 05, 2019 (Tuesday), we are very pleased to welcome American new media artist Erin Johnson, who will give a talk on the topic The Way Things Can Happen

The talk will start at 4:00 pm in M6094 Future Cinema Studio.

Date: March 05, 2019 (Tuesday)

Time: 4:00 pm

Venue: M6094 Future Cinema Studio, Run Run Shaw Creative Media Centre, 18 Tat Hong Avenue, Kowloon Tong

Topic: The Way Things Can Happen

 Abstract:

 Erin Johnson makes interdisciplinary and collaborative single and multi-channel video installations that blend documentary, experimental, and narrative practices.

These research-driven projects explore social, political, and geographical imaginaries through site-specific performances that foreground the ways in which individual lives and socio-political realities merge together.

Biography:

Erin Johnson is a feminist, interdisciplinary artist, and curator who uses video, sound, performance, and social practice to explore the blurred lines between rehearsal and performance; real and imagined landscapes and borders; and perception, memory, and interpretation. Johnson’s work has been exhibited at museums and galleries such as Delaware Center for the Contemporary Arts, Vox Populi, HERE Arts Center, New Mexico State University, Pelican Bomb, Southern Exposure, Root Division, 1708 Gallery, Cornell University, ZERO1 Biennial, and the Asheville Art Museum. Johnson has been a visiting fellow or artist-in-residence at institutions such as the The School of Information at University of Texas at Austin.

February 26: Professor Thomas Tsang

For the next colloquium of the semester, held on February 26, 2019 (Tuesday), we are very pleased to welcome Professor and curator Thomas Tsang, who will give a talk on the topic “A room with many houses

The talk will start at 4:00 pm in M6094 Future Cinema Studio.

Date: February 26, 2019 (Tuesday)

Time: 4:00 pm

Venue: M6094 Future Cinema Studio, Run Run Shaw Creative Media Centre, 18 Tat Hong Avenue, Kowloon Tong

Topic: A room with many houses

Abstract:

Can exhibition practice serve as a universal language, where image and text are exchanged and expanded? How does the craft meet through these languages? As an artist, architect, designer, educator, editor, and among the many things, and everything – Tsang will share his experience from his studies at the Cooper Union to his residency at the American Academy in Rome, as the Rome Prize in Architecture fellow, from his one-year stint working as a carpenter at Juilliard School to his recent collaboration with composers to develop his personal endeavor in Sounding Architecture.

The presentation will articulate his cross-border works and the reflection on his curatorial practice in design, visual art, sound art, and other forms practice dealing with the foundation of the social practice that the work itself, to discuss on the more considerable extent how he emerges from science and art in architecture.

Biography:

Born in the Island of Borneo, East Malaysia. Received his professional degree in architecture at the Cooper Union. His work integrates artistic practice with architecture in installations and exhibitions. His curatorial projects includesCloud of Unknowing: A City with Seven Streets(2014) at Taipei Fine Arts Museum (w/ Roan Ching-yueh), Grand Opening Projects(2013–2016) at Miniature Museum in Beijing, ‘10 x 100 Exhibition’ at PMQ (2017), Mass Transit Railway (MTR) Art in Architecture Station for the Hong Kong West Kowloon railway station (2014-2018), and recently, 2018 Hong Kong Exhibition at the 16th International Architecture Exhibition – La Biennale di Venezia.

He is a recipient of numerous awards, including the coveted Marion O. and Maximilian E. Rome Prize from the American Academy in Rome, Civitella Ranieri Fellowship, and Mellon Artist in Residence at the Wellesley College. His work has exhibited at the UABB (Shenzhen), M+ Museum, MNAC Bucharest, 10th Shanghai Biennale, Shanghai Project and Sandwich Gallery in Bucharest. His current project entitled Sounding Architecturetackles in the area of sound and space exploring the diverse sensibilities in performance genre.

His publications include ‘On the Edge: Ten Architects from China’ (2007) and ‘Open City: Existential Urbanity’ (2015). He is the co-chief editor for The Hong Kong Institute of Architects Journal, Occupyand chief-editor of Sounding Architecture Manifest. Taught at the Cooper Union and China Academy of Art, currently an Associate Professor in the Department of Architecture, at The University of Hong Kong.

More on:

www.dehow.com

February 14, 2019: Ruijun Shen

For the 3rd colloquium of the semester, held on February 14, 2019 (Thursday), we are very pleased to welcome Chinese curator and artist Ruijun Shen, who will give a talk on the topic Into Nature: my practice as a curator and artist.

The talk will start at 4:00 pm in M6094 Future Cinema Studio.

Date: February 14, 2019 (Thursday)

Time: 4:00 pm

Venue: M6094 Future Cinema Studio, Run Run Shaw Creative Media Centre, 18 Tat Hong Avenue, Kowloon Tong

Topic: Into Nature: my practice as a curator and artist

Abstract:

Instead of images, Ruijun Shen constructs situations and create experiences in her work. She believes that human beings live in situations where every objects and events are interconnected. Everything can be transformed into something else in order to achieve a dynamic balance. Taking nature as reference, Shen’s work is involved in different media, including painting, drawing, installation and animation. As a curator, Shen has curated many successful exhibitions in China and the U.S.

Chinese garden is a long-term research topic on Shen’s curatorial practice. In this lecture, Shen will introduce her artistic practice as well as her method of taking Chinese garden as an entry point for contemporary curating. Some questions such as the function of art, the way towards professional artist and curator paths, the way of finding the self will be discussed.

Biography:

Ruijun Shen conceptualizes her painting-based practice as a form of extended meditation and a means of processing tensions between time and space in the world around us. Inspired by Confucianism and Tao Chinese philosophy, her work is deeply invested in exploring the various connections that define our everyday. Shen received her MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and has exhibited extensively throughout China as well as internationally.

January 22: Dr. Giorgio Biancorosso

For the second colloquium of the semester, held on January 22, 2019 (Tuesday), we are very pleased to welcome Dr. Giorgio Biancorosso, who will give a talk on the topic Wong Kar Wai’s Soundtracks or The Filmmaker as Music Bricoleur.

The talk will start at 4:00 pm in M6094 Future Cinema Studio.

Date: January 22, 2019 (Tuesday)

Time: 4:00 pm

Venue: M6094 Future Cinema Studio, Run Run Shaw Creative Media Centre, 18 Tat Hong Avenue, Kowloon Tong

Topic: Wong Kar Wai’s Soundtracks or The Filmmaker as Music Bricoleur

Abstract:

Composition, we are taught, is the creation from scratch of new sound structures. Yet since time immemorial musicians have repurposed already-existing music into their own work. This practice, referred to as borrowing, blurs the line between composition and performance and forces us to rethink the nature of musical creativity: Is it singular or diffused, individual or communal? Recording, tape and now digital technologies have added new dimensions to musical borrowing. By making it easier to encounter, store and play back vast amounts of repertoire, they have enabled countless people—including non-musicians—to mix and match musics from the most disparate sources. After anthropologist Lévi-Strauss, I call this mode of composition ‘musical bricolage’ and argue that filmmakers are among its most consummate masters. To bear this out, I examine the musical nexus at the heart of Wong Kar Wai’s cinema. Directing films is for Wong a way of channelling creatively the habit of chancing upon, collecting and listening to music in the commercial and artistic entrepôt of Hong Kong. Wong’s use of already-existing music is shaped by the circumstances of his films’ production and reception, his celebrated ‘musical ear’ as well as penchant for ‘poaching’ music from other films (ranging from old Chinese melodramas to European art films). There emerges is a unique modus operandi through which music loses its previous associations and acquires a new and sometimes surprising identity. Far from being instances of citation, homage or allusion, Wong’s musical borrowings are expedient and transformative. The soundtracks to his films chart his transformation from music lover and end-user into bona fide composer or better re-composer of the very repertoires he explores—the filmmaker as music bricoleur.

Biography:

Giorgio Biancorosso (PhD, Princeton, 2001) is the author, most recently, of Situated Listening: The Sound of Absorption in Classical Cinema(Oxford University Press, 2016) and “The Phantom of the Operaand the Performance of Cinema (Opera Quarterly, 34:2-3, 2018). His work on the history and theory of listening practices reflects a long-standing interest in musical aesthetics, film music, and the history of global cinema. Before moving to The University of Hong Kong, where he is now Associate Professor in Music and Director of the Society of Fellows in the Humanities, in 2001-2003 he was a Post-Doctoral Fellow at Columbia University’s Society of Fellows in the Humanitiesand a Visiting Assistant Professor in Music also at Columbia in 2003-04. Aside from film music, film criticism, and musical aesthetics, his interests include musical dramaturgy and the psychology of music. Biancorosso is also active in Hong Kong as a programmer and curator. He is the Chairman of the Hong Kong New Music Ensembleand a member of the Programme Committee of the Hong Kong Arts Festival. In recognition of his work, HKU awarded him the Outstanding Young Researcher Award in 2009 and the Research Output Prize (Arts) in 2016/17.

January 17, 2019: Jacco Borggreve

For the first colloquium of the semester, held on January 17, 2019 (Thursday), we are very pleased to welcome Netherlands-based new media and performance artist Jacco Borggreve, who will give a talk on the topicA Grey Dilemma: Artificial Life and Artificial Death.

The talk will start at 4:00 pm in M6094 Future Cinema Studio.

Date: January 17, 2019 (Thursday)

Time: 4:00 pm

Venue: M6094 Future Cinema Studio, Run Run Shaw Creative Media Centre, 18 Tat Hong Avenue, Kowloon Tong

Topic: A Grey Dilemma: Artificial Life and Artificial Death

Abstract:

As new and emerging technologies seem to act in an increasingly more lifelike manner and humans begin to tinker at the very fundamental of biological life and previously conceived binary states of being are increasingly more blurred or proven false, it is time to rethink our notions of the ontology of life and by extension rethink the concept of death. Using examples from philosophy, mythology, art, popular culture and media theories Borggreve will examine why the current definitions of life will soon prove to be problematic and how we could better prepare for new, artificial and perhaps alien forms of life.

Biography:

Jacco Borggreve is a Netherlands-based new media and performance artist who has used implants, biomedical sensors, data-exhibitionism and automated processing to research the quantified self, data-ontology, death, self, unity and the body. He became national news after using his implant to broadcast his location in a performance that lasted eight months. This performance lead to participation in an ethics committee regarding citizen surveillance and smart-city development for the Dutch government. He was a guest curator for a series of exhibitions in Lil’ Amsterdam Gallery, his work was awarded the Trias Innovationis prize for Art & Science by QAQS. The artist collaborated with the University of Twente on a series of projects regarding citizen participation and multiculturalism. Borggreve is currently involved in research within the faculties of Smart City Research, Smart Textiles and Ambient Intelligence at Saxion University of Applied Sciences where he is leading a course on capacitive relational thinking, supervising a graduation project on the use of EEG systems in Smart City development and furthering his research on performing arts, artificial life and complex system theory.